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Ratifying the Constitution Signing the Constitution Delegates to the Constitutional Convention The Work Begins Writing the Constitution The Great Compromise Bill of Rights Powers of the Federal Government The Three Branches of Government Checks and Balances Amendments Women - The Right to Vote

The Great Compromise

The Compromise of the Century
http://cyberlearning-world.com/nhhs/amrev/begin.htm
This page provides a brief overview of The Great Compromise, a brief bio of Roger Sherman, and a editorial cartoon, "America's Great Compromise." Two quizzes to test your political skills are also included.

Crossword Puzzle - The Original Thirteen States
http://bensguide.gpo.gov/3-5/games/13states.html

Ben is writing an article for his paper about the states and the Constitutional Convention. Help him identify state trivia to include questions about the original thirteen states that were in existence at the time of The Great Compromise.

Matching Activity - The Origins of American Government http://www.cyberlearning-world.com/lessons/vocabch2qz.htm
Match each of the fifteen terms (including The Great Compromise) with its correct definition.

Quiz - The Great Compromise
http://www.cyberlearning-world.com/nhhs/amrev/beginq3.htm

Test yourself on the basics with these five questions

Quiz - The Great Compromise
http://www.cyberlearning-world.com/nhhs/amrev/beginq4.htm

Test your political skills about The Great Compromise

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The Great Compromise saved the Constitutional Convention, and, probably, the Union. Authored by Connecticut delegate Roger Sherman, it called for proportional representation in the House, and one representative per state in the Senate (this was later changed to two.) The compromise passed 5-to-4, with one state, Massachusetts, “divided.”

Surf with Uncle Sam
Surf with Uncle Sam


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