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Introduction Democracy Democracy vs. Autocracy The Original Thirteen Colonies The Declaration of Independence, Part I The Declaration of Independence, Part II The Articles of Confederation

 




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Books & Reading




Democracy Democracy vs.Autocracy The Original Thirteen Colonies The Declaration of Independence, Part I The Declaration of Independence, Part II The Articles of Confederation

The Declaration of Independence, Part I

The Revolutionary War broke out on April 19, 1775, at the Battle of Lexington and Concord.

By the time the Second Continental Congress met in May 1775 to discuss stronger action for independence, tensions in the American colonies ran very high. Colonists who did not wish to remain British subjects declared themselves "Patriots" -- those who remained faithful to England called themselves "Loyalists."

On June 11, 1776, the Second Continental Congress appointed a committee of five men to write a Declaration of Independence from British Rule. Those five men were Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Livingston, and Roger Sherman. Jefferson wrote the first draft. The committee declared it to be almost perfect. The committee presented the document to the Congress after making a few corrections. Following a few more changes, Thomas Jefferson's work was approved. Church bells rang out on July 4, 1776, the day the Declaration of Independence was adopted and our nation was officially born.

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The words "United States" cannot be found in the Declaration of Independence.

When the Founding Fathers adopted "The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America" [wiki] on July 4, 1776, they didn’t form the nation called "The United States of America."

The United States of America actually came into being on March 1, 1781, when the Second Continental Congress ratified the Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union (or more commonly known as the Article of Confederation [wiki]).


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