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Introduction Election Day Voting Election of the President Candidates Political Parties Primary Election National Conventions National Conventions - An Inside View Candidates at the Convention The Campaign Polling Places The Electoral College The Electoral Map The Inauguration

 




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Books & Reading





Obama Inaugural Address


Primary Election Political Parties Election Day Voting Election of the President Candidates National Conventions National Conventions - An Inside View Candidates at the Convention The Campaign Polling Places The Electoral College The Electoral Map The Inauguration

The Inauguration

The new President is inaugurated on January 20. A President who is re-elected must be sworn in again. The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court reads the Oath of Office outside the Capitol Building. The President and Vice President swear to do their jobs to the best of their abilities and to be faithful to the Constitution. There is a huge parade up Pennsylvania Avenue to the White House after the official ceremony. The new President rides in a limousine or walks along the parade route, smiling and waving to the crowd. Many fancy inaugural balls are held all over the city of Washington at night to celebrate the President’s election.

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Originally, Inauguration Day was held on March 4, giving the next administration enough time to get up and running. But in 1933, with the country facing a huge economic crisis, the four months in between Election Day and Inauguration Day seemed too long. The 20th Amendment was ratified on January 23, 1933, fixing Inauguration Day as January 20.


Surf with Uncle Sam
Surf with Uncle Sam


Word Spy
Word Spy


Projects You Can Do

Obama Stencil Silhouette

 

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