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  Elections

Introduction Election Day Voting Election of the President Candidates Political Parties Primary Election National Conventions National Conventions - An Inside View Candidates at the Convention The Campaign Polling Places The Electoral College The Electoral Map The Inauguration

 




Books & Reading

Books & Reading





Primary Election Political Parties Election Day Voting Election of the President Candidates National Conventions National Conventions - An Inside View Candidates at the Convention The Campaign Polling Places The Electoral College The Electoral Map The Inauguration

The Election of the President

One of the most important events in American government and politics is the election of the president. This event is held every four years and is often compared to a race. We say that someone is “running for office” and that the “presidential race” is on. People who are trying to be elected to a particular official job are called “candidates.” Almost any citizen who wants to be president can announce that they are a candidate. Usually, serious candidates for president are people with a lot of experience in government (e.g., governors of states or members of Congress). Choosing presidential candidates can begin more than two years before the actual election.

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Gerald Ford was the only person to serve as both President and Vice President without being elected to either office.

Surf with Uncle Sam
Surf with Uncle Sam


Word Spy
Word Spy


Projects You Can Do

A candidate's support in a state is measured by wooden cubes (red for Nixon, blue for Kennedy). At the start of the game, many states are empty, but some are predisposed to support one candidate or the other. For example, Massachusetts starts with two blue cubes while Ohio and Illinois each start with a red cube.

The game primarily revolves around the 91 campaign cards, which were painstakingly researched and evoke the ambiance of this historic election. These cards allow players to add cubes to the board, collect cubes (which are used at several key points during the game), advertise in a region, and more.

 

The Dirksen Congressional CenterCopyright 2008